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  Outside of a managed care system of treatment, Kip was obviously in need of intensive therapy, such as two visits per week rather than one visit every three weeks.

Even Hicks' use of language is managed care-friendly as he stated that he did not give Kip a full psychological evaluation because it was not in his "contract." He also states he was not contracted to work with Kip on the teen's use of explosives; nor was he "mandated" to consult with Kip's parents about the purchase of a Glock handgun shortly before the termination of therapy and not long after the teen was put on Prozac-again slavishly following typical managed care cost-effective "treatment" protocols.

  Since 75-80% of school-age children are covered by one type of managed care or HMO plan, our concern should be about the quality of mental health care, not just a societal safety-net insuring treatment for all children.

Managed care may not like it but the public should be educated so that tragedies like these can be prevented, and lives saved.


* This article originally appeared in The National Psychologist, May/June 2000 Vol. 9, No. 3, page 16. Reprinted with permission from The National Psychologist, 6100 Channingway Blvd., Suite 303, Columbus, Ohio 43232; 614-861-1999.

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